FEATURED POST: HAVING TROUBLE WITH SCAMMERS? HOW TO IDENTIFY FAKE BANKING EMAILS

HAVING TROUBLE WITH SCAMMERS? HOW TO IDENTIFY FAKE BANKING EMAILS

Without any doubt, fake emails are sent by scammers for several reasons which are not beneficial to you.
How does it work? It’s simple; it works by getting you to visit fake sites in order to input your personal information.
Mind you, the emails are oftentimes difficult to identify because they portray very close semblance with the original email coming from your bank.
So, to this effect, we’ve compiled, just for you, some tips on how to identify these emails and what to do if you suspect you’ve gotten one.
Let’s trek through it together;

#NEVER TRUST THE DISPLAY NAME

ONE of the major tactics cyber criminals employ is to deceive you through the display name of the email.
The mail portrays the name and logo of your bank such that you easily believe it’s coming right from your bank.
So, to reduce the chances of becoming a victim of scammers, first verify the email address in the header; if there’s anything unusual or fishy, no matter how insignificant or negligible it may seem, don’t open the mail.

#HOVER YOUR CURSOR BUT DON’T CLICK

WAIT! Don’t just click on links within the content of the email without verifying where the URL points to.
Hover your cursor over the link without clicking. Fortunately, most browsers provide this benefit by displaying the information when you hover your cursor over the link without clicking. If the link looks strange, don’t click on it.
Well, if your browser doesn’t really provide that benefit, no cause for alarm! You could simply test the link by opening another tab( a new tab) and input the website address directly.

#CHECK FOR SPELLING ERRORS OR POOR SENTENCE CONSTRUCTION

BANKS are 100% serious about emails. You seldom find any error in spelling or poor sentence construction in their emails( not disputing the fact that there can be).
So, it’s advisable you go through your email painstakingly and report anything suspicious.

#BEWARE OF THREATENING TONES

BE wary of subject lines that invoke a sort of feeling of fear or urgency and requesting you fill in your information or call a particular number. Banks hardly use such tones in their emails. BE CAREFUL!
Banks see you as a customer and not a threat to their system so they relate in a customer-friendly manner even through their emails.

TO WRAP IT UP, never you forget;

√ Don’t trust the display name
√ Hover your cursor but don’t click
√ CHECK for spelling errors and/or    poor sentence construction
√ Beware of THREATENING TONES
Don’t just ignore, it’s advisable you pass(share) this across to your friends and kinsfolk. Take precautionary measures now!

27 thoughts on “FEATURED POST: HAVING TROUBLE WITH SCAMMERS? HOW TO IDENTIFY FAKE BANKING EMAILS

  1. Thanks for posting this awesome article. I’m a long time reader but I’ve never been compelled to leave a comment.

    I subscribed to your blog and shared this on my Facebook.
    Thanks again for a great article!

  2. Hi there! Thanks a lot for subscribing, sharing and for the comment.

    We'll continue giving it our best shot to see that we present GROWTH to people.
    Thanks for reading.

    1. I wouldn’t deny the fact that there are tough times on the road but it’s possible. You could follow mostlyblogging.com and some others for more on blogging.

  3. Thanks a lot for sharing this with all folks you really recognise what you are
    talking approximately! Bookmarked. Kindly additionally discuss with my web site =).
    We may have a hyperlink alternate arrangement between us

  4. This is the right website for everyone who really wants to understand this topic.
    You know a whole lot its almost hard to argue with you (not that I actually will
    need to…HaHa). You certainly put a fresh spin on a subject that
    has been written about for years. Wonderful stuff, just excellent!

  5. My coder is trying to convince me to move to .net from PHP.
    I have always disliked the idea because of the costs.
    But he’s tryiong none the less. I’ve been using Movable-type on numerous websites for about a year and
    am worried about switching to another platform. I have heard
    good things about blogengine.net. Is there a
    way I can import all my wordpress content into it? Any help would be really appreciated!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.